Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://cris.pasteurorg.ru/handle/123456789/92
Title: Tuberculosis epidemiology and selection in an autochthonous Siberian population from the 16th-19th century
Authors: Dabernat, Henri
Thèves, Catherine
Bouakaze, Caroline
Nikolaeva, Dariya
Keyser, Christine
Géraut, Annie
Duchesne, Sylvie
Gérard, Patrice
Alexeev, Anatoly N
Crubézy, Eric
Ludes, Bertrand
Mokrousov, Igor V. 
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Source: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0089877
Journal: PLoS ONE 
Abstract: Tuberculosis is one of most ancient diseases affecting human populations. Although numerous studies have tried to detect pathogenic DNA in ancient skeletons, the successful identification of ancient tuberculosis strains remains rare. Here, we describe a study of 140 ancient subjects inhumed in Yakutia (Eastern Siberia) during a tuberculosis outbreak, dating from the 16(th)-19(th) century. For a long time, Yakut populations had remained isolated from European populations, and it was not until the beginning of the 17(th) century that first contacts were made with European settlers. Subsequently, tuberculosis spread throughout Yakutia, and the evolution of tuberculosis frequencies can be tracked until the 19(th) century. This study took a multidisciplinary approach, examining historical and paleo-epidemiological data to understand the impact of tuberculosis on ancient Yakut population. In addition, molecular identification of the ancient tuberculosis strain was realized to elucidate the natural history and host-pathogen co-evolution of human tuberculosis that was present in this population. This was achieved by the molecular detection of the IS6110 sequence and SNP genotyping by the SNaPshot technique. Results demonstrated that the strain belongs to cluster PGG2-SCG-5, evocating a European origin. Our study suggests that the Yakut population may have been shaped by selection pressures, exerted by several illnesses, including tuberculosis, over several centuries. This confirms the validity and necessity of using a multidisciplinary approach to understand the natural history of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.
URI: https://cris.pasteurorg.ru/handle/123456789/92
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089877
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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